Aircraft A4-AX350 Data

Browse by Manufacturer

1 aircraft record found.
A4-AX350

1942 Avro 625A Anson 1 C/N Not found A4-AX350

Discuss this aircraft in forum
Latest photos of A4-AX350
  • A4-AX350 @ GREENOCH - Avro 625A Anson 1 at Lincoln Nitschke's Aviation Museum, Greenoch, South Australia in 2004. - by Malcolm Clarke by Malcolm Clarke @ GREENOCH
  • A4-AX350 @ GREENOCH - Avro 625A Anson 1 at Lincoln Nitschke's Aviation Museum, Greenoch, South Australia in 2004. - by Malcolm Clarke by Malcolm Clarke @ GREENOCH

Airframe Info

Manufacturer:Avro
Model:625A Anson 1    Search all Avro 625A Anson 1
Year built:1942
Construction Number (C/N):Not found A4-AX350
Aircraft Type:Fixed wing multi engine
Number of Seats:4
Number of Engines:2
Engine Type:Reciprocating
Engine Manufacturer and Model:Armstrong Siddeley Cheetah IX
Also Registered As:
MG390  De-registered

Aircraft

Registration Number:A4-AX350
Current Status:Preserved

Owner

Owner:Lincoln Nitschke Aviation Collection
Address:Greenock, South Australia
Australia

User Comments

Malcolm Clarke, 2013-03-27 12:55:15
 Originally MG390 ex RAF. First received by the RAAF on the 6th of February 1942, and on the 4th of September 1942 was transferred to Number 1 Air Observation School. The following year on the 21st of January the aircraft was allocated to the Number 1 Navigation and Wireless Air Gunnery School at Ballarat. However, in heavy rain and attempting to land at night at Point Cook in Victoria on the 16th of August 1943, the aircraft hit a tree and crashed with its undercarriage semi-retracted. From the 11th to the 25th of October of that year, the plane was repaired and overhauled and returned to service. Later in its career, the plane was allocated to Number 6 Service Training Flying School at Mallala, where it remained until it was sold off by the RAAF to a farmer located 6 kilometres away from the airfield for use as spare parts on farm machinery in the post World War 2 period when metal supplies were short. To ensure the plane could not be flown in an un-airworthy state, the RAAF chopped off the wings in a position similar to where the wings finish now.
Didn't originally have a gun turret, and it was simply skinned over during its time as a trainer with the RAAF, but since entering the museum, it has had a manually operated Armstrong Whitworth gun turret attached.