Aircraft G-BOAG Data

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1 aircraft record found.
 
G-BOAG

1978 Aerospatiale-BAC Concorde 1-102 C/N 100-014

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Total 22 photos. View all photos
Latest photos of G-BOAG
  • G-BOAG @ BFI - 1978 Aerospatiale-BAC Concorde 1-102, c/n: 100-014 at Seattle Museum of Flight - by Terry Fletcher by Terry Fletcher @ BFI
  • G-BOAG @ BFI - 1978 Aerospatiale-BAC Concorde 1-102, c/n: 100-014 at Museum of Flight - by Terry Fletcher by Terry Fletcher @ BFI
  • G-BOAG @ KBFI - Seattle Museum of Flight - by Nick Taylor Photography by Nick Taylor Photography @ KBFI
  • G-BOAG @ KBFI - Seattle Museum of Flight - by Nick Taylor Photography by Nick Taylor Photography @ KBFI

Airframe Info

Manufacturer:Aerospatiale-BAC
Model:Concorde 1-102    Search all Aerospatiale-BAC Concorde 1-102
Year built:1978
Construction Number (C/N):100-014
Aircraft Type:Fixed wing multi engine
Number of Seats:N/A
Number of Engines:4
Engine Type:Turbojet
Engine Manufacturer and Model:Rolls-Royce Olympus 593 Mk. 610-14-28
Also Registered As:
G-BFKW  Re-registered as G-BOAG  Delivery: 1980-01-29  Cancel: 1981-02-09

Aircraft

Registration Number:G-BOAG
Mode S (ICAO24) Code:4004B9
Current Status:Preserved
Registration Cancel Date:2004-05-04

Owner

Owner:Museum of Flight
Address:Seattle,
United States

User Comments

Malcolm Clarke, 2012-06-28 13:19:49
 G-BOAG (214) first flew on 21 April 1978 from Filton. The aircraft that flew the final Speedbird 2 service from New York on 24 October, left Heathrow for the final time on 3 November 2003. It spent a day "resting" and refuelling in New York before making its final flight on 5 November 2003 from New York JFK to Boeing Field, Seattle in an unusual supersonic flight (which required special permission) over the uninhabited part of northern Canada, to Seattle, where it is currently displayed at the Museum of Flight, alongside the first 707 that served as Air Force One and the prototype Boeing 747. This Concorde was once used as a source of spares, before being restored using parts from Air France's F-BVFD and has flown 16,239 hours. (Wikipedia)