Chris Hall's Photo Gallery

Total 76564 pictures. 197 in this folder.   Contact    Home

 
 Gallery Home

Aircraft and aiport photos are sorted separately. Airport photos always shown after aircraft photos.

ZG477 photo, click to enlarge
delivered to the RAF in 1990 as a GR.7 then upgraded to GR.9A spec at BAe Warton in 2004. Delivered to the RAF Museum 19/12/2011
XL703 photo, click to enlarge
preserved at the RAF Museum, Cosford
XL568 photo, click to enlarge
suspended from the ceiling in the National Cold War Exhibition hangar at the RAF Museum, Cosford
XK724 photo, click to enlarge
The first Folland Gnat F1 from the batch of six development aircraft the fly
XH672 photo, click to enlarge
veteran of the 1st Gulf war preserved at the RAF Museum, Cosford
XB812 photo, click to enlarge
suspended from the ceiling in the National Cold War Exhibition hangar at the RAF Museum, Cosford
G-AEEH photo, click to enlarge
displayed at the RAF Museum, Cosford
G-ACGL photo, click to enlarge
displayed at the RAF Museum, Cosford
XX946 photo, click to enlarge
at the RAF Museum, Cosford
XV249 photo, click to enlarge
This Nimrod made it's final flight in to Kemble 29/07/2011 where it was dismantled by ASI. It was transported to the RAF Museum at Cosford by road on 10/03/2012
XV249 photo, click to enlarge
51 Squadrons disbandment scheme
XV202 photo, click to enlarge
delivered to the RAF Museum, Cosford 12/08/2011
XV202 photo, click to enlarge
delivered to the RAF as a C Mk 1 in 1967. converted to a C Mk 3 by Marshall of Cambridge in 1982
XV202 photo, click to enlarge
now displayed at RAF Museum Cosford, this was the last RAF C130K Mk.3 to be retired
XS709 photo, click to enlarge
preserved at the RAF Museum, Cosford
XS709 photo, click to enlarge
preserved at the RAF Museum, Cosford
XS709 photo, click to enlarge
preserved at the RAF Museum, Cosford
XS709 photo, click to enlarge
delivered to the RAF Museum, Cosford 11/02/2011
XN962 photo, click to enlarge
painted with the incorrect serial XN972 which was scrapped in 1984
XL993 photo, click to enlarge
Known as the 'Twin Pin', the Twin Pioneer was a follow-up to the same company's single-engined short take-off and landing (STOL) transport, the Pioneer, and like the latter required an area only 30m (99ft) by 275m (902ft) in which to operate.
XD145 photo, click to enlarge
One of several projects designed to meet an Operational Requirement for a rocket interceptor, work on the SR53 started in 1952. However, due to development delays the first prototype did not fly until 16 May 1957.
WV562 photo, click to enlarge
at the RAF Museum, Cosford
WV562 photo, click to enlarge
at the RAF Museum, Cosford
WK935 photo, click to enlarge
A much modified Meteor F8 fighter, the 'prone position' Meteor, was used to evaluate the advantages of coping with the effects of gravity while flying lying down.
TG511 photo, click to enlarge
at the RAF Museum, Cosford
TA639 photo, click to enlarge
at the RAF Museum, Cosford
RG804 photo, click to enlarge
Spitfire replica built for the TV programme "Toy Stories" presented by James May. Based on the Airfix kit it was constructed out of fibreglass by Gateguards of Cornwall
RG804 photo, click to enlarge
Spitfire replica built for the TV programme "Toy Stories" presented by James May. Based on the Airfix kit it was constructed out of fibreglass by Gateguards of Cornwall
G-EBMB photo, click to enlarge
The Cygnet was the first aircraft to be designed by Sydney Camm after he joined what was then the Hawker Engineering Company.
G-ACGL photo, click to enlarge
displayed at the RAF Museum, Cosford
G-ACGL photo, click to enlarge
recent addition to the RAF Museum, Cosford
A-515 photo, click to enlarge
one of the five Pucara's that survived the Falkland war and shipped back to the UK
191614 photo, click to enlarge
in a new colour scheme from my last visit
74-0177 photo, click to enlarge
at the RAF Museum, Cosford. The 492nd Fighter Squadron (492 FS) is part of the 48th Fighter Wing based at RAF Lakenheath, England
68-8284 photo, click to enlarge
at the RAF Museum, Cosford
BAPC083 photo, click to enlarge
at the RAF Museum, Cosford
XM598 photo, click to enlarge
The Museum's aircraft XM598 was selected as reserve aircraft for the bombing raids on Port Stanley airfield during the Falklands campaign and on six occasions was airborne heading for the Falklands.
68-8284 photo, click to enlarge
Sikorsky MH-53M Pave Low IV
TX214 photo, click to enlarge
Later Ansons, some with metal wing structure, were used as light transports and were in production up until 1947, by which time a total 11020 Ansons had been built in the UK and Canada
XG337 photo, click to enlarge
The first P1B Lightning flew on 4 April 1957, It was known as the Lightning and was capable of supersonic interceptions of enemy aircraft; it remained in front line service for nearly three decades
WG777 photo, click to enlarge
Fairey test-pilot Peter Twiss flew the first FD2, WG774, on its maiden flight on 6 October 1954. On the 10 March 1956 an attempt was made on the World Air Speed Record, which Twiss broke by more than 483kph (300mph). The new record was 1820kph (1132mph)
L-866 photo, click to enlarge
Royal Danish Air Force
XA564 photo, click to enlarge
The Javelin was the world's first twin-jet delta-wing fighter, designed to intercept bombers at high altitudes and at high subsonic speeds. Electronic and radar devices gave it an all-weather capability
XX496 photo, click to enlarge
preserved at the RAF Museum, Cosford
68-8284 photo, click to enlarge
Sikorsky MH-53M Pave Low IV
XL703 photo, click to enlarge
The last Pioneers were withdrawn in 1969, after being used by 'C' Flight of No.20 Squadron in Singapore to guide their Hunters onto ground targets. This aircraft is the only surviving example of the type.
WL679 photo, click to enlarge
The prototype Varsity T MkI made its maiden flight on 17 July 1949. The RAF took its first deliveries in October 1951 which went to No.201 Squadron, Advanced Flying School at Swinderby, Lincolnshire.
XR977 photo, click to enlarge
preserved in 'Red Arrows' colours at the RAF Museum, Cosford
TA639 photo, click to enlarge
de Havilland Mosquito at the RAF Museum, Cosford
TS798 photo, click to enlarge
Manufactured by Avro and incorporating the wings, tail, undercarriage and engines of the Lancaster bomber, the York was to prove a useful military and civilian transport aircraft in war and peace.
420430 photo, click to enlarge
The origins of the Me410 Hornisse (Hornet) can be traced to the catastrophic failure of an earlier design the Me210. A marked improvement on its predecessor, the Me410 entered front line service in March 1943 and 1100 were built.
191614 photo, click to enlarge
Messerschmitt Me 163B-1a Komet
BAPC082 photo, click to enlarge
The Hind was a development of the Hart and was supplied to the Royal Air Force as an interim type to permit the formation of new bomber squadrons during the early expansion schemes prior to the outbreak of the Second World War.
BAPC082 photo, click to enlarge
The Hind was a development of the Hart and was supplied to the Royal Air Force as an interim type to permit the formation of new bomber squadrons during the early expansion schemes prior to the outbreak of the Second World War.
VP546 photo, click to enlarge
Originally designed in 1935 to perform the roles of casualty evacuation, army co-operation and liaison, the Storch (Stork) was noted for its remarkable STOL (Short Take-Off and Landing) performance.
TX214 photo, click to enlarge
The first prototype flew on 24 March 1935 and subsequently 174 of the type were ordered. The Anson became the first aircraft in RAF service to have a retractable undercarriage. Despite being obsolescent, it remained in Coastal Command service until 1942.
G-EBMB photo, click to enlarge
The Cygnet was the first aircraft to be designed by Sydney Camm after he joined what was then the Hawker Engineering Company. Two were built as the company's entries in the Air Ministry Light Aeroplane Competition of 1924, in which they performed well.
WV562 photo, click to enlarge
Percival P.56 Provost T1 preserved at the RAF Museum, Cosford
WV746 photo, click to enlarge
Entering service in 1953, the Pembroke took over from the venerable Anson in the light transport and communications role. It was developed from the Prince civil transport having a longer wing to carry an increased all-up weight.
BAPC084 photo, click to enlarge
Mitsubishi Ki-46 'Dinah'
44-73415 photo, click to enlarge
North American P-51D Mustang
XN714 photo, click to enlarge
This unusual looking research aircraft was capable of flight at speeds as low as 51.5kph (32mph) by virtue of its 'jet flaps' which used thrust ducted from the main engine to increase lift.
XR977 photo, click to enlarge
preserved in 'Red Arrows'colours at the RAF Museum, Cosford
XN962 photo, click to enlarge
Blackburn Buccaneer S1 Nose section, preserved at the RAF Museum, Cosford
VP546 photo, click to enlarge
Fieseler Fi.156 C-7 Storch, preserved at the RAF Museum, Cosford
XF926 photo, click to enlarge
Nicknamed 'Flaming Pencil', only two Bristol 188s ever flew, a third being used for ground tests.
XF926 photo, click to enlarge
Air brakes on the Bristol 188
100143 photo, click to enlarge
Focke Achgelis FA330. This aircraft was actually an unpowered autogyro kite, intended for use as an observation platform for German U-Boats
XR525 photo, click to enlarge
First flown in January 1962, the RAF variant, the HC Mk 2, was a high-performance development of the Mk 1, with two coupled Bristol Siddeley Gnome turboshaft engines. It was intended for transport, ambulance and general purpose duties
WK935 photo, click to enlarge
A much modified Meteor F8 fighter, the 'prone position' Meteor, was used to evaluate the advantages of coping with the effects of gravity while flying lying down.
44-73415 photo, click to enlarge
North American P-51D Mustang
G-AIZE photo, click to enlarge
Preserved at the RAF Museum, Cosford
XL703 photo, click to enlarge
In the 1950s the Pioneer amazed the crowds at Farnborough air shows by taking-off across the runway instead of along it. The Pioneer's outstanding short take-off and landing performance made it ideal for operations in the jungles of Malaysia and Borneo
LF738 photo, click to enlarge
Hawker Hurricane IICB, Preserved at the RAF Museum, Cosford
XR220 photo, click to enlarge
Bristol Siddeley Olympus BOl.22R (Mk. 320) turbojet
44-73415 photo, click to enlarge
North American P-51D Mustang
LF738 photo, click to enlarge
The Hurricane first flew in November 1936. It was the main aircraft of RAF Fighter Command squadrons during the Battle of Britain where it equipped thirty-two squadrons between July and October 1940.
191614 photo, click to enlarge
Messerschmitt Me 163B-1a Komet
XD674 photo, click to enlarge
Preserved at the RAF Museum, Cosford
G-AFAP photo, click to enlarge
The Ju52/3m, flew in April 1932. Orders for this robust aircraft, which could carry seventeen passengers or eighteen troops, soon started coming in and included an order for three from the pre-war British Airways, whose colours this example is displayed
XF926 photo, click to enlarge
Although a maximum speed of Mach 1.88 was reached this fell short of the required Mach 2 performance. This, combined with fuel leaks, an endurance of only 25 minutes and the cancellation of the Avro 730, led to the cancellation of the Bristol 188 project
L-866 photo, click to enlarge
Royal Danish Air Force
204 photo, click to enlarge
Koninklijke Marine (Royal Netherlands Navy)
K9942 photo, click to enlarge
built in April 1939, this is the oldest surviving example of a Spitfire mkI
WK935 photo, click to enlarge
the "prone position" cockpit
XL993 photo, click to enlarge
Known as the 'Twin Pin', the Twin Pioneer was a follow-up to the same company's single-engined short take-off and landing (STOL) transport, the Pioneer, and like the latter required an area only 30m (99ft) by 275m (902ft) in which to operate.
XD145 photo, click to enlarge
One of several projects designed to meet an Operational Requirement for a rocket interceptor, work on the SR53 started in 1952. However, due to development delays the first prototype did not fly until 16 May 1957.
XX654 photo, click to enlarge
Preserved at the RAF Museum, Cosford
G-AOVF photo, click to enlarge
G-AOVF was built for BOAC and first flew on 18 December 1957. The highlight of its career was its use by HRH Princess Margaret on a tour of the West Indies in 1958. G-AOVF flew into Cosford from Southend on 31 May 1984.
A-515 photo, click to enlarge
Five Pucara's survived the Falkland war in reasonable condition and were shipped back to the UK. This aircraft was chosen for performance evaluation by the AAEE at Boscombe Down and was returned to flying condition during 1983